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choosing lasik surgeon

It’s great that you have decided to get LASIK surgery done, and you’d probably want to choose the best LASIK surgean in Fresno for your procedure.

What you need, is a LASIK surgeon who is qualified, experienced, affordable, and helps you feel at ease. You want to make sure that you are in good hands and your eye surgeon has complete knowledge and understanding of the LASIK procedure.

To find the right LASIK surgeon in Fresno, you need to take the time to do proper research because there are a lot of options out there. Here’s how to choose the best eye doctor in Fresno for LASIK eye surgery.

  1. Experience

    Consider a qualified surgeon who is experienced and up-to-date with the latest technology and trends. When you contact the eye clinics in Fresno, make sure you ask these questions:

    • Does the surgeon have experience with new LASIK technologies?
    • For how long has the surgeon been performing LASIK?

  2. License
    Check whether the eye surgeon is licensed to practice. You can validate the surgeon’s credentials on state licensing boards or National Practitioner Data Bank.
  3. Certification
    If you want to know if the LASIK surgeon in Freson you’re considereingis certified beyond having a basic license to practice medicine, then check if the surgeon is certified by entities like the American Board of Medical Specialties and American Board of Ophthalmology. Such entities require the board-certified eye surgeons to go through specific training and continued education related to their specialty.
  4. Technology
    Technology is ever-evolving. Choose a surgeon who feels that it is important to invest in these technologies to perform LASIK surgery accurately and efficiently.
  5. Location
    Consider a clinic that is close to your place of residence. A clinic closer to home saves time and avoids the hassle of extra travel during treatment.
  6. Price
    While cost could be a major factor in deciding the right LASIK surgeon, don’t skimp on the quality to save money. The cost of the surgery usually depends on the surgeon, the clinic, the location, and the technology. If you want the best of everything, your LASIK eye surgery cost might be high. So balance out your expectations and consider a surgeon who meets your expectations at a price you can afford.
  7. Financing Options
    Ask your insurance company about possible LASIK treatment coverage. If possible, use your insurance to cover the LASIK eye surgery cost. If this is not possible, then talk to the clinic to find out if they have any in-house finance options or if they can work out a plan for you.
  8. Staff
    When narrowing down your LASIK surgeon options, keep the staff in mind. You do not want an inattentive group of people with no interest in their patients to help you out with the LASIK procedure. So, find out whether they are accommodating, courteous, welcoming, and accessible.
  9. Friend or Family Recommendation/Referrals
    Your friends, neighbors, and family members are invaluable resources that can help you find the right eye clinic. Ask them questions like these:

    • Was their experience good?
    • Would they recommend the eye doctor to others?

    You can also ask for a referral from your regular optometrist or ophthalmologist in Fresno.

  10. Online Reviews
    Going through online LASIK eye surgery reviews is another way to get to know about the eye surgeon from people who have already undergone treatment. However, take these reviews with a pinch of salt and use them to help gauge your options and not make them a determining factor.

If you want the best LASIK surgeon to correct your vision, then invest your time to look for the best surgeon for your LASIK in Fresno. This step is crucial in increasing your chances of achieving a satisfying visual outcome.

If you’re you looking for a LASIK surgeon in Fresno for your procedure, contact Insight Vision Center for more information and we can help you with all your LASIK needs in our state-of-the-art eye and vision center.

Coronavirus and eyes

By now, the whole world knows what COVID-19 is capable of doing – fever, cough, and shortness of breath that can take 2 to 14 days to show up after a person is exposed to the virus. In some people, the infection can get so severe that it can develop into pneumonia, leading to complications or even death.

According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, a couple of reports suggest that coronavirus can also cause pink eye (conjunctivitis) in the infected person.

How Coronavirus Can Affect Your Eyes

Health officials believe that conjunctivitis develops in about 1% to 3% of people with coronavirus.

Conjunctivitis is an infection of the membrane, known as conjunctiva that lines the eyelid and covers the white part of your eyeball. The symptoms of pink eye include itchiness, redness, tearing, discharge that forms a crust, and a gritty feeling in the affected eye.

How Coronavirus Is Transmitted

When a person infected with coronavirus sneezes, coughs, sneezes, or talks, the virus can spray from their nose or mouth into your face. It’s likely that you inhale these droplets through your nose or mouth, and it’s also likely for the virus to enter your eyes too.

If you touch an object that has been contaminated with the virus – like the door knob – and then touch your eyes, the virus can enter your eyes.

The doctors at Insight Vision Center, Fresno, CA, have been closely following the coronavirus updates and would like to offer tips on how to stay healthy and protect your eyes while hunkering down at home.

Below are some eye protection guidelines you can follow:

  1. Avoid rubbing your eyes.
    If you have the urge to rub your eyes or adjust your eyeglasses, don’t use your fingers, instead use a tissue. And if you must touch your eyes, wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds before and after touching your eyes.
  2. Switch to eyeglasses for a while instead of wearing contact lenses.
    If you tend to touch your eyes a lot for no apparent reason, consider wearing glasses more often. Wearing eyeglasses instead of contact lenses decreases the irritation in your eyes due to contact lenses, and you are more likely to pause before you touch your eyes. If you want to continue wearing contact lenses, ensure that you follow the contact lens hygiene to reduce your chances of an infection.
  3. Wear glasses for an added layer of protection.
    Although sunglasses or corrective eyeglasses can protect your eyes from virus-infected droplets, they do not provide 100% protection. The virus can enter into your eyes through the exposed areas such as the side, top, and bottom of the glasses. If you are taking care of a sick patient or if you are potentially exposed to the virus, wear safety goggles for a stronger defense.
  4. Stock up on critical eye medicines.
    Don’t wait until the last minute to contact your pharmacy and request a refill of your medications. During the lockdown, there may be a shortage of supplies, so it is advisable to stock up on critical medications, enough to get you by in emergency situations during the quarantine. If you have trouble getting approval from your insurance company, ask your pharmacist or your ophthalmologist for help.
  5. Practice safe hygiene and social distancing.
    Follow these general guidelines issued by The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to slow the spread of disease:
    • Wash your hands as often as possible for at least 20 seconds using soap and water. Make it a habit to wash your hands after you use the restroom, cough, sneeze or blow your nose, and before eating.
    • If you do not have access to soap and water, use a hand sanitizer (with at least 60% alcohol).
    • Avoid touching your face — eyes, nose, and mouth.
    • If you cough or sneeze, use a tissue and throw it away immediately. If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your elbow and then wash your hands.
    • Maintain social distancing. Avoid close contact with people. Stay at least 6 feet away from a person with a respiratory infection.
    • Stay home when you are sick.
    • Disinfect commonly touched objects and surfaces, such as countertops and doorknobs in your house.

Lazy eye

Also known as amblyopia, lazy eye is a vision development disorder that causes abnormal visual development in early childhood. It is developed when the eye and the brain are not stimulated properly, and the brain favors one eye over the other. It can also be said that when nerve cells responsible for vision do not develop as they should, it results in a ‘lazy eye’.

Usually, amblyopia occurs in one eye, but in some cases, it can occur in both the eyes.

What causes lazy eye?

Here are the leading causes of a lazy eye:

Strabismus – A condition where the muscles responsible for the positioning of eyes are imbalanced is known as strabismus. This imbalance makes it difficult to track an object with both eyes together. As a result, the eyes turn out or cross.

Now to avoid double vision, the brain ignores the visuals received by the misaligned eye. This eventually leads to a lazy eye.

Stimulus Deprivation – When light doesn’t enter an eye due to some obstruction, it tends to become weaker. It could be due to eye surgery, glaucoma, a scar, cataract, etc.

Refractive Amblyopia – When eyes have unequal refractive errors despite correct alignment, it can lead to amblyopia. For example, there may be near or farsightedness in just one eye. Or, there may be significant astigmatism in one eye and not the other.

What are the symptoms of a lazy eye?

Here are the symptoms you must look for:

  • Blurred Vision – When both the eyes together cannot focus on a single object clearly, the resulting image tends to be blurred.
  • Double Vision – This is caused due to the misalignment of eyes.
  • Miscoordination – Because of a lack of coordination between the eyes, they can’t focus on an object.
  • Eye Turn – It is a common symptom when both the eyes turn in different directions.

How is the lazy eye diagnosed?

Your eye doctor will examine both your eyes, checking for a wandering eye, eye health, difference in vision between two eyes, or poor vision. Before conducting the exam, they will use an eye drop to dilate your eyes which may result in a blurred vision for up to several hours.

In infants, a magnifying device is used for an eye examination. The eye doctor may also assess their ability to follow moving objects and fix their gaze at a stationary object.

In children above the age of 3, the test is done using pictures and letters.

Amblyopia Treatment

  1. Glasses, Contact Lenses or Lasik Surgery
    Your doctor may prescribe corrective glasses or contact lenses to help you focus on things clearly. This, sometimes, also helps with double vision.

    In certain cases, your doctor may suggest undergoing Lasik eye surgery which not only eliminates the problem entirely but also stops it from forming again in the future.

  2. Surgery and Eye Care
    Lazy eye surgery is done to improve the turn and alignment of the eye. After the surgery, you will have to wear an eye patch over the dominant eye. This strengthens the weaker eye. The patch develops the part of the brain that controls the vision.
  3. Atropine Drops
    Atropine drops are put in the unaffected eye to blur its vision. They dilate the vision in the good eye so that the weaker eye can work more and better.

Early treatment of amblyopia is extremely critical because if overlooked, the condition can lead to permanent vision problems. So, for proper visual development in kids, consult your doctor as soon as you notice any symptoms.

contact lenses for astigmatism

Astigmatism is a disorder of the eye where the irregularly shaped cornea causes blurred vision, discomfort, and headaches. Most people have some degree of astigmatism. Astigmatism often co-exists with myopia (nearsightedness), and hyperopia (farsightedness).

Usually, the surface of the cornea is round, like a basketball. For people with astigmatism, the surface is shaped like a football, and the eye is not able to focus light rays to a single point.

Astigmatism can be easily corrected with eyeglasses or contact lenses. Contact lenses provide a clearer, and a wider field of vision, and provide greater comfort than glasses.

The type of contact lens you have depends on the type of astigmatism you have. Your ophthalmologist will be able to prescribe the right type of contacts for your condition. The contact lens for you could be one of the following:

Types of Contact Lens for Astigmatism

  1. Toric Contact Lenses – Toric contact lenses are specially designed to correct moderate amounts of astigmatism. These are made of either a hydrogel material or a highly breathable silicone hydrogel. The word Toric comes from the geometric shape ‘torus.’ A torus looks like a donut, and Toric lenses are shaped like a slice of a donut so they align with the irregularly shaped cornea to give the wearer proper vision.

    Toric contact lenses need to be prescribed by the doctor who can choose contact lenses that are right for your vision and customize them accordingly.
  2. Gas Permeable Contact Lenses – Gas permeable contact lenses can correct astigmatism without being shaped like a Toric. These contacts for astigmatism are rigid and retain their spherical shape instead of molding to the irregular shape of the cornea. This uniform curve of the gas permeable contact lens replaces the irregularly shaped cornea as the primary refracting surface of the eye.

    It takes more time fitting gas permeable contact lenses as compared to fitting soft contact lenses and costs more than getting fitted with Toric lenses.

    Almost 75% of the astigmatic participants said that their vision was better with gas permeable contact lenses. Out of the test subjects, only 10% had worn their gas permeable contact lenses prior to the study, and 60% ended up wearing these gas permeable lenses after the study.

  3. Hybrid Contact Lenses – Hybrid contact lenses are great for most patients with corneal astigmatism. Hybrid contact lenses combine the best of both worlds — the center is made of a rigid gas permeable material, and the surrounding zone is made of a hydrogel or a silicone hydrogel like in Toric lenses. This helps the wearer provide the comfort of Toric lenses and the accuracy of vision of gas permeable contacts for astigmatism.

    Since these are more customized contacts for astigmatism, they need more time and expertise in fitting. But since these lenses are custom-made for the wearer, they’re more sturdy and better to wear for sports.

Most people with mild astigmatism (up to 0.50D) can wear soft, disposable contact lenses that don’t have any correction for astigmatism. You can still achieve 20-20 vision with a small amount of uncorrected astigmatism.

The experienced team at the InSight Vision Center will help you get the best contact lens, no matter what your level of astigmatism is. Make an appointment now.

Blurry vision

Majority of people who have difficulty in seeing make a very common mistake when describing their poor vision. They interchangeably use the terms blurry vision and cloudy vision. However, there is a thin line of difference between both these terms. Both of them can be caused due to very different reasons. So, let’s find out what exactly these conditions are and understand their causes.

What is Blurry Vision?

Blurry vision is when the object you are looking at appears to be out of focus. In such condition, you may feel that squinting will make the object clearer. One of the best examples of blurry vision is the way an image appears on camera before you adjust the lens or give it a moment to focus on the subject. Symptoms include poor peripheral or left or right field of vision.

What are the Causes of Blurry Vision?

There are multiple factors which can cause blurry vision. Some of the most common ones are as follows:

  • Near-sightedness, far-sightedness or astigmatism
  • Cataracts
  • Corneal scarring or opacification
  • Abrasions to cornea
  • Age-related macular degeneration
  • Optic Neuritis
  • Retinopathy
  • Injury or trauma to the eyes
  • Infectious retinitis

Some conditions in particular can cause headache as well as a blurry vision. These include migraine, low blood sugar, stroke etc.

What is Cloudy Vision?

Cloudy vision is when it feels like you are looking at everything through a haze or fog. You might feel like there is a film on your eyes and you can almost wipe or blink it away. For instance, looking through smudged glasses or through a window on a foggy morning is what having a cloudy or foggy vision feels like. It can be caused due to different reasons. Hence, the combination of its symptoms depends on the underlying cause. Its commonly occurring symptoms are as follows:

  • Double vision
  • Appearance of halos around lights
  • Light sensitivity
  • Watery or dry eyes
  • Poor night time vision
  • Bloodshot or red eyes

What are the Causes of Cloudy Vision?

One of the most common eye condition which causes cloudy vision is cataracts. As a part of the aging process, the lens of the eye loses its transparency in cataracts. Hence, it is generally seen in older people. Dirty or damaged contact lenses are also a very common factor resulting in cloudy vision. Besides, if the contacts are worn for too long, eyes become overly dry and can result in cloudy or blurred vision.

Other causes include changes in or damage to the cornea due to infections or inflammations. Also, conditions such as macular degeneration, optic nerve disease and diabetes may cause your vision to turn cloudy.

Since blurry vision and cloudy vision both can indicate presence of certain serious health issues, it’s important to get your eyes regularly checked. An ophthalmologist can identify early signs of eye health issues and even detect related signs of other underlying diseases.

If you too are experiencing any symptoms of either blurry or cloudy vision, or have any queries related to eye health, get in touch with us. Our experienced team at InSight Vision Center can help you with any queries or issues related with vision and eye health.

eyewear for sports

If you are a sportsperson who also wears glasses, then you know that the most frustrating thing is not being able to perform well in sports because your vision is blurry.

Though you should not wear glasses for contact sports such as rugby, soccer and hockey; you must speak to your ophthalmologist to get the right pair of sports eyeglasses when you play other sports.
Sports eyeglasses is essential gear for an active sportsperson.

If you have seen an athlete with an eye injury, they will tell you how it can be prevented by simply wearing strong, durable sports eyeglasses.

And if you have prescription glasses, don’t even think of wearing your regular eyewear when you are playing sports. Glass lenses may shatter under impact and cause an eye injury. Eyeglass frames also don’t qualify for use as safety eyewear because they too might break under impact and may inadvertently hurt you.

You have a bunch of options to protect your eyes when you are playing sports. This includes goggles, eye shields and face masks.

Goggles are useful when swimming, face masks, made of metal or hard fibre cages protect all of your face. Since these are hardly used outside sporting events, most of the time ophthalmologists recommend sports people to wear polycarbonate glasses. Polycarbonate is a specific type of tough and durable plastic.

Sports eyeglasses
Sports eyeglasses should be made of polycarbonate lens because:

Virtually Unbreakable

Polycarbonate lens are resistant to impact, in comparison to glass or other types of plastic lens.
Polycarbonate lens are made up of a thermoplastic material which begin as solid, small pellets. These small solid pellets form into the shape of a lens which is then compressed under high pressure and cooled to create a proper lens.

Weightless

Since polycarbonate lens are thinner than other lenses, it makes them an ideal choice for people with strong prescriptions. Lightweight and thin sports eyeglasses that will stay put on your face and not move around will be more comfortable while you are playing sports.

UV Protection

Polycarbonate glasses help to protect exposure from ultraviolet (UV) radiation. This will also help prevent any eye diseases like cataracts and macular degeneration.
You generally need protection from the UV rays when you are out playing in an open ground, and polycarbonate glasses help block out harmful UV rays.

Anti-Scratch

Adding a scratch-resistant layer to your already scratch-proof polycarbonate lens will make sure that your sports eyeglasses can withstand any point of impact.

It is really important to get the best possible eyewear to maximize your sports performance. For this you need to select the right frame proper fit of sports eyeglasses is very important for both safety and comfort.

Any sportsperson who wants to achieve their best in the sport they play, then having an excellent vision is an essential factor in achieving the desired success. Sports eyeglasses should be at the top of your list when you shop for gear and accessories to enhance your game.

If you are looking to buy the right eyeglasses that are ideal for your sports activities and daily needs, our expert team at InSight Vision Center will help you find them in Fresno, CA.

untreated cataracts

A massive 25 million Americans have cataract. It is a common eye condition in which the lens of the eye gradually becomes weak and your vision is impaired completely. A research done by the study “The Future of Vision” estimates the number of cataract patients will rise to 38.5 million by 2032 and 45.6 million by 2050. (Source: https://www.preventblindness.org/millions-americans-have-cataract) Cataract massively reduces the sharpness of vision. The most common sign is a yellowish-brown tint that clouds your vision.

June is Cataract Month

June has been declared as Cataract Awareness Month by Prevent Blindness to educate the masses on the symptoms, risk factors, and available treatment options. As you age, your eyesight takes a backseat and you rely a lot more on your reading glasses for every activity that you undertake. Cataract often ambushes the eyesight of adults over 40. But untreated cataracts do not come with a lot of noticeable symptoms.

It starts with a difficulty to see things around you. Most people assume it’s a prescription upgrade they require and the first thing they do is rush to an optometrist. Some people might not be able to work or read under the same light, often not realizing you’re damaging your vision a little more. Untreated cataracts get worse with time and before you know it; your vision will get blurry to the point where no type of prescription lenses will work. Many people may also suffer from a dry eye that can leave you feeling tired all the time.

But there’s no need for you to suffer for too long. These signs often indicate that it’s time for you to get cataract surgery.

Here are Some Signs for Untreated Cataracts:

  • Double Vision
  • Double vision is an early sign of cataract. The cloudy layer on the eye lens can scatter the light entering your eyes which leads to the formation of two images. Looking for correction measures earlier is necessary to avoid adverse problems.

  • Difficulty Discerning Colors
  • Cataract may affect your color vision. You may see some colors faded, and slowly, your vision may take on a yellowish or brownish tinge. Discoloration due to cataract often goes ignored. But if it worsens, for example, difficulty distinguishing purples and blues, you must get your eyes examined.

  • Compromised Night Vision
  • With age, the cells in your pupil grow and die inside it. Because they are not as active, debris fills in, leading to cataracts. While they don’t express any painful symptoms, your vision slowly turns blurry. The first symptom you’re likely to experience is compromised night vision. Cataracts manipulate the light that reaches your eyes. You might see halos around objects that are lit up.

  • Total Blindness
  • Untreated cataracts lead to the road of complete blindness or legal blindness. People often feel worried when they hear the word “blindness”. But blindness caused by cataracts is reversible to restore your vision with the help of cataract surgery and a pair of special contact lenses is designed for both adults and children.

    Cataract Surgery Complications at a Later Age

    Though cataract is a safe procedure, it can, like other surgeries, often pose the risk of complications and serious medical illnesses. And the level of risk at an older age is higher. Let’s have a look.

  • Slow and inconvenient recovery
  • With age, the risk of developing serious diseases such as thyroid, hypertension, cancer, etc. increases. And people with these pre-existing conditions have higher chances of showing signs of complications such as slow recovery. Diabetes, which is a common health issue in seniors, can alter the healing process dramatically.

  • Side-effects of Medication
  • Some people at an older age may not respond to medications very well. And this can lead to complications. For example, using steroids for long-term can make them likely to develop an infection. Or, the medication used for thinning the blood to prevent blood clots can make bleeding likely.

    You won’t be able to do much about your age or a family history of cataracts. But you definitely make alterations to your diet. Eating foods rich in vitamin C and vitamin E can help prevent cataracts.
    Try to add plenty of vegetables to your meals or add them as sides. Some effective ways to delay the progression of cataracts include reduced exposure to UV rays, eating vitamin-rich foods, avoiding smoking, and wearing the right eye protection gear to prevent eye injuries.

    If you already facing vision problems, visit your eye doctor to check for signs of untreated cataracts. Cataract surgery will restore your vision so that you don’t struggle with poor vision as you age.

    Book an appointment with an experienced eye doctor in Fresno, CA to correct your vision so that you enjoy the simple pleasures of life just as everyone else does!

Swimming with contact lenses

There’s no other activity that gives you that total-body workout as much as an hour of swimming does. From toddlers to seniors, it’s an activity enjoyed by all. The summers have already begun and everyone wants to cool off with a dip in the pool.

But have you wondered what the water is doing to your eyes? Swimming with contact lenses can potentially damage your eyesight. Your eyes may not only suffer bacterial contamination but in addition, you may experience irritation in the eye once you step out of the pool. Infections and sight-threatening conditions like a corneal ulcer may be a potential vision battle.

Eye Issues Due to Swimming:

Your eyes are safe as long as bacteria and irritants don’t get through the tear film that keeps the cornea lubricated. The moment chlorine and the tear film interact; your tear is exposed to the chemical in chlorine which carries a ton of pollutants.

Here’s a look at the two common eye conditions caused by chlorine exposure:

  1. Conjunctivitis
  2. Conjunctivitis is often known as Pink Eye and is a water-borne bacterial eye infection.

  3. Eye Irritation
  4. Eye irritation caused by chlorine results in redness and blurry vision, along with the damage of the tear film.

Swimming With Contact Lenses:

When you are swimming with contact lenses, the cornea in your eye suffers a setback in the form of an infection. Chlorine water should never touch your contact lenses. This is especially dangerous to your vision because your lenses may shrink and deprive it of the oxygen it needs. For certain contact lenses like the gas permeable (GP) ones, your ophthalmologist will strongly discourage you from wearing them while swimming. In case you forget to take them off while swimming, make sure you dispose them off immediately.

At InSight Vision Center, we recommend that you use daily disposable lenses if you are a regular swimmer.

We recommend you to take the following precautions if you are swimming with contact lenses:

  1. Wear Well-Fitted Goggles
  2. If you are swimming with contact lenses, your eyes will need that extra layer of protection. Well-fitted goggles are essential part of your swimming gear since pools contain a ton of chlorine. Your vision will not be compromised underwater. And vision problems like eye irritation and infection will not surface.

  3. Use Eye Drops
  4. If you experience even the slightest irritation after a swim, it suggests that your eyes need some lubrication. Put a few drops in each eye to restore the tear film on your eyes.

  5. Take off Your of Contact Lenses
  6. Taking your contact lenses off is your best bet. Chlorine can let bacteria enter your eye lens which can result in a more serious problem. If you absolutely insist on wearing them, get them cleaned with a solution immediately after a swim.

  7. Visit Your Eye Doctor
  8. In case the pain or irritation persists more than a day, it’s time for you to visit your eye doctor. Address the issues to your doctor and how long you have been suffering the irritation.

    Swimming is a fun way to exercise and stay fit. But the activity comes with some responsibility. Take all the necessary precautions before diving into the pool. Make sure you take your contact lenses off if you often experience eye irritation. Don’t ignore any signs that may bring discomfort to your eyes.

    Book an appointment with an experienced eye doctor in Fresno, CA if you have persisting eye irritation or if you need a fresh pair of contact lenses recommended to you.

Vision with Astigmatism

It’s not every day that you see people talking about interesting facts about eyesight. But how much do you really know about your eye health? There are some who are blessed with perfect 20/20 vision, while others are completely blind.

But what about people with certain eye conditions? How can you tell if you have poor vision at all? Twitter’s recent post has spread like wildfire and fueled responses from around the world. It’s making people question their eyesight. The below tweet shows what vision with astigmatism looks like versus vision without astigmatism.

Here’s a Look at Vision with Astigmatism versus Clear Vision:

In the first image, the light from the brake lights and traffic sign appear distorted, stretching into a wide, starbust shape. This exactly indicates what vision with astigmatism looks like. In the second image, the lights coming off of the traffic light appear softer and have a halo shape, which represents clear vision.

This tweet has gathered over 80,000 reactions and has convinced many people they have vision with astigmatism. Most of the people who reacted thought the image on the left was a representation of perfect vision and the results have shocked them. Some people with glasses thought the distorted vision was actually a normal condition. But what really is astigmatism? And what does it tell you about eye care? Read on to learn more.

What is Astigmatism?

Astigmatism is the most common refractive error in the world and it causes blurred vision. In fact, the number of people with astigmatism outdoes those with conditions like nearsightedness or farsightedness. And it has to do a lot with the shape of your eye. Early astigmatism diagnosis helps you identify how severe your condition is.

Let’s say you have someone who has no astigmatism at all. Their cornea is perfectly round. Some patients have eyes shaped like a basketball, while others have a shape that resembles an egg.

If you have astigmatism, you have two different curvatures to mainly your cornea. And what is the cornea? It’s a window that sits over the colored part of your eye. So someone that has astigmatism has a steep part to the eye and the other side is a lot flatter.

And that creates two refractive surfaces when light enters the eye. So instead of having one power to your prescription contacts or glasses, you actually have two for vision correction.

Symptoms of Astigmatism

The symptoms of astigmatism may be different in each individual. Some may have all symptoms, while others may have just one or none at all.

Here’s a Look at the Astigmatism Symptoms:

  • Distorted, blurry or fuzzy vision up close and far away
  • Trouble seeing at night
  • Eyestrain
  • Headaches
  • Squinting
  • Eye Irritation

The viral tweet you just saw definitely lives up to its claim. Blurry vision, headaches, dry eye, eye strain, and squinting are symptoms you should not be ignoring. Now that you’re aware of the symptoms, check with your family members if they experience the same. You should also ask your eye doctor about what causes astigmatism.

Show them the tweet if necessary and make them identify which image they usually see. Since astigmatism is a common symptom, it can be easily treated with eyeglasses, contact lens, and laser surgery.

Children are prone to astigmatism and it can affect their learning growth if not corrected quickly. Eye vitamins are also essential for growing kids. Also, an eye exam is important not just to correct blurry vision, but it is to safeguard your overall health and wellness.

Don’t put it off for any longer. Schedule an appointment with an experienced eye doctor in Fresno, CA to correct your vision.

Image Source: Unusual Facts

Bad eyesight

Bad vision can be caused by nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism. These can be corrected with glasses, contact lenses, or some surgeries. These conditions are genetic to a certain extent, but may also be influenced by your environment. Globally, about 80% of vision impairment cases are avoidable (Source: https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/blindness-and-visual-impairment). But here’s what science has to say.

Environment over Genetics

If two people are nearsighted, it’s more likely their children will be nearsighted. However, if a child spends a lot of time reading or working up close, and not much time outside, they may actually need reading glasses. But if kids are brought up in the right environment, they can maintain good eyesight without experiencing headaches and perform well at school and other activities.

How Can You Treat Bad Eyesight?

1. Inculcate Good Habits

There are plenty of good habits you can inculcate in your child to prevent them from struggling with poor eyesight. Most kids these days carry digital devices with them wherever they travel.

We’ve seen kids with phones and iPads on the trains, outside a movie theatre, and of course at home. You need to limit the amount of time your kids spend on these devices. These gadgets also shouldn’t be easily accessible. And instead, it should act as a reward.

Kids should also be encouraged to spend more time outdoors rather than simply gaming or sitting in front of a television. Motivate them to play with the neighbor’s kids or find time to play a ball game with them. Make sure they’re active for a major part of the day.

2. Provide Vitamins for Eyesight

Providing vitamins for eyesight is another way for you to make sure that you encourage healthy eating habits and an overall improved lifestyle. This includes eating the right foods that give your kids’ eyesight a big boost. But healthy foods don’t necessarily have to be boring.

Your kids are simply not going to eat an entire bowl of salad. But if you try to include green vegetables in an omlette, sandwich, or pasta, they will consume all the right vitamins. Encourage your kids to also eat citrus fruits, fish, eggs, and nuts. These foods contain plenty of nutrients and help your child maintain a well-balanced diet.

3. Get an Early Eye Exam

While good habits and a healthy diet are important to maintain eyesight, it’s also crucial for you to take your kids for an early eye exam. Many kids may suffer from poor eyesight without even realizing it.

A healthy set of eyes is essential in the growing years. It helps kids understand the world around, familiarizes them with their immediate environment and people. Good eyesight also helps your child concentrate in the classroom without experiencing mild headaches and blurred vision.

Taking your kids to an eye doctor will help detect any early eye conditions that can be easily corrected with glasses. In the growing years, kids should get a yearly eye exam done to help them succeed in the classroom, in sports, and in other activities.

Poor vision may be hereditary to an extent but doesn’t affect your kids’ eyesight if a healthy routine is put into place. If you’re looking for an experienced eye doctor in Fresno, CA, book an appointment with Insight Vision Centre today for a comprehensive eye assessment of your kids’ vision. Book an eye exam today.

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